Most people know that fresh vegetables are better for you than frozen or canned, but many struggles with the best way to store them. Here’s a quick guide to help make sure your veggies stay fresh for as long as possible!

Lettuce

Lettuce can be stored in the refrigerator for up to three weeks. They should be washed, cleaned and wrapped loosely with an absorbent paper towel before storing it. Use a tray or shallow plastic container to store lettuce, and do not place other foods on top of lettuce because they will prevent proper air circulation. Plastic bags are not recommended because they trap moisture.

Cabbage

Store cabbage in a plastic bag in the refrigerator after removing any discolored or wilted leaves. Make sure you store cabbage in the crisper drawer and not next to fruits like apples, which gives off ethylene gas that will have a negative effect on your cabbage (Remember: The cold air from your refrigerator can cause condensation on the outside of plastic bags or containers, so be careful.) Also, don’t forget to wash your vegetables before storing them – it will help keep them fresher longer!

Bell Pepper

Bell peppers should be used within a week of purchase. Store whole peppers in a plastic bag in the refrigerator and wash before using. Once you cut into a bell pepper, store any unused portion in an airtight container or wrapped tightly with plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out.

Celery

Unused portions of celery should be stored in the refrigerator wrapped tightly with plastic wrap. Celery will stay fresh for about five days after being purchased, even if it’s not wrapped in plastic wrap, but wrapping it tightly will help restore its crisp texture more quickly when you are ready to use it!

Onions

If you have extra space in the vegetable bin of your refrigerator or room in your pantry, it might be worth storing a few onion sets this way. However, always make sure they are completely dry before placing them in storage as exposure to moisture leads to decay! When you bring onions home from the grocery store, remove any plastic wrap around them and leave the roots intact if possible – that will help prevent decay while allowing them to breathe. Keep in mind that once you cut into an onion, it begins losing its vitamin C content, so try to use it as soon as possible! If you plan to store your onions for more than two weeks, place them in an area where they won’t be exposed to sunlight and heat.

Potatoes

Store potatoes in a cool, dark, and well ventilated area. Ideally, they should not be stored in the refrigerator because it will cause them to sprout faster (and you won’t want that)! If you have extra space in your pantry or another storage area, you can store potatoes there. Being exposed to light causes potatoes to turn green, so avoid storing potatoes near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples. If wrapped tightly with plastic wrap, most potato varieties will last up to two weeks after purchase. If you need them longer than that, place them in an area that doesn’t get much light and won’t get excessively warm.

Radish

Store radishes unwashed and not in direct sunlight because it leads to decay (radishes should be washed before use). They are best used within one week of purchase but can last up to two weeks if stored properly – try placing them in the vegetable bin or your refrigerator’s crisper!

Spinach

In general, spinach should be consumed within 24 hours after purchase. However, spinach is actually pretty durable so as long as you store it correctly, you shouldn’t have any issues with it lasting longer than that! When you get home from the grocery store, remove the spinach leaves from their plastic packaging and place them in a clean container. Place that container in your refrigerator’s crisper to keep it cold but avoid storing it on an exposed shelf where it could be exposed to light because that can cause the leaves to turn brown faster. If you are only using one or two of those leaves before they go bad, simply tear off what you need with a clean pair of kitchen shears – this will help them last much longer than if you were to cut each leaf individually!

Tomatoes

Never freeze tomatoes unless they are in a recipe that calls for them to be used cold (i.e., pasta sauce) because it lessens their flavor and texture. Instead, store them at room temperature in a cool area out of direct sunlight with plenty of airflow to help slow the ripening process. Avoid storing tomatoes near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples because they will spoil faster! Once you get home from the grocery store, wash your tomatoes right away and dry thoroughly using paper towels – this will prevent excess moisture that leads to decay. You can also place a cut open onion alongside your tomatoes to help absorb any moisture build-up, which helps prevent decay.

Broccoli

To prevent broccoli from rotting:

  1. Remove any plastic wrap covering the stalks when you get home from the grocery store.
  2. Place unwashed broccoli in a sealed container and store at room temperature in a cool area out of direct sunlight with plenty of air flow to prevent spoiling.
  3. If you’ll be using the broccoli within a few days, store it in your refrigerator’s crisper drawer but only if it is wrapped tightly or covered with plastic wrap to avoid contact with other foods.

Beets

When buying beets, choose ones that are firm and unblemished. Beets will get damaged much more easily than other vegetables so take care when handling them! Because they give off an intense amount of ethylene gas during the ripening process, avoid storing them near fruits or vegetables that do the same like apples, bananas, pears, and tomatoes. For longer storage periods (more than one week), place unwashed beets in a sealed container with a moist cloth (but do not use water as this can damage the skin) at room temperature in a cool area away from direct sunlight.

Carrots

To ensure carrots have maximum longevity, buy firm ones, bright in color, and have smooth skins without cracks or soft spots. For longer storage periods (more than one week), carrots should be stored around 41 degrees Fahrenheit with 90 percent relative humidity. The ideal place to store carrots is in a constant temperature environment with more moisture – the higher and less regulated that temperature, the better!

Your refrigerator’s crisper drawer is perfect for storing carrots because it provides both of these conditions (but remember not to wash your carrots until you are ready to use them). Avoid placing carrots near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples, as this will cause decay. Instead, try storing it alongside items like celery or broccoli with similar storage needs.

Cauliflower

To ensure cauliflower has maximum longevity, buy firm ones, have green leaves with no brown spots or decay, and smell like cabbage. For longer storage periods (more than one week), cauliflower should be stored around 41 degrees Fahrenheit with 90 percent relative humidity. The ideal place to store cauliflower is in a constant temperature environment with more moisture – the higher and less regulated that temperature, the better!

Your refrigerator’s crisper drawer is perfect for storing cauliflower because it provides both of these conditions (but remember not to wash your cauliflower until you are ready to use it). Avoid placing cauliflowers near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples, as this will cause decay. Instead, try storing it alongside items like celery or carrots that have similar storage needs.

Cucumber

Opt for cucumbers that are heavy for their size, thin skinned, and free of soft spots or cuts when purchasing them at the store. To prevent spoilage, cut off both ends of your cucumber before putting it into a sealed container with a moist cloth (but do not use water as this can damage the skin). Store in around 41 degrees Fahrenheit with 90 percent relative humidity. The ideal place to store cucumbers is in a constant temperature environment with more moisture – the higher and less regulated that temperature, the better!

Your refrigerator’s crisper drawer is perfect for storing cucumbers because it provides both of these conditions (but remember not to wash your cucumber until you are ready to use it). Avoid placing cucumbers near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples, as this will cause decay. Instead, try storing it alongside items like celery or zucchini with similar storage needs.

Garlic

When buying garlic, choose heads that are firm with tight papery skin. For longer storage periods (more than one week), store the garlic in a cool, dry area around 41 degrees Fahrenheit with 90 percent relative humidity. The ideal place to store garlic is in a constant temperature environment with more moisture – the higher and less regulated that temperature, the better! Store garlic away from onions as the gases produced by both of these vegetables react to one another and cause spoilage. Avoid placing garlic near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples, as this will cause decay. Instead, try storing it alongside items like carrots that have similar storage needs.

Ginger

Purchase ginger that is plump and firm with smooth skin, avoiding any pieces that feel soft or shriveled. For longer storage periods (more than one week), store ginger in the refrigerator around 41 degrees Fahrenheit with 90 percent relative humidity. The ideal place to store ginger is in a constant temperature environment with more moisture – the higher and less regulated that temperature, the better!

Your refrigerator’s crisper drawer is perfect for storing ginger because it provides both of these conditions (but remember not to wash your ginger until you are ready to use it). Avoid placing ginger near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples as this will cause decay and inst have similar storage needs.

Kale

When buying kale, choose leaves that are as dark green and crisp as possible. For longer storage periods (more than one week), store the kale in a cool, dry place around 41 degrees Fahrenheit with 90 percent relative humidity. The ideal place to store kale is in a constant temperature environment with more moisture – the higher and less regulated that temperature, the better!

Your refrigerator’s crisper drawer is perfect for storing kale because it provides both of these conditions (but remember not to wash your kale until you are ready to use it). Avoid placing kale near fruits or vegetables that give off an overwhelming amount of ethylene gas like apples, as this will cause decay. Instead, try storing it alongside items like celery or carrots that have similar storage.

Artichokes

If you need to store the artichokes for a long time, it is best to buy them in a sealed pack. This will ensure that they remain fresh for a longer time. If you buy them near the end of the day and then refrigerate them, they will remain fresh. If you are not going to use them for a long time, it is best to remove the hard outer leaves and store in a sealed pack in the refrigerator. You can also trim off all but 3 or 4 inches of the stem if you plan on keeping these for long, as this part tends to dry up faster when stored. This is how I usually keep artichokes at home.

Not only will proper vegetable storage help your food last longer, but it will also bring out some of their unique flavors to make your meals more exciting! Try implementing some of these tips into your weekly routine, and let us know which ones work best!

Mushroom

Mushrooms are a delicacy, and they should be stored in the refrigerator because they are sensitive to air. They should be placed in sealed bags or containers so that they will last longer. When storing mushrooms vertically, make sure that you place the stem up to avoid breaking it. If you need to store the mushrooms for long periods of time, it is best to buy them at the end of the day before grocery stores close and then refrigerate them. The crisper drawer of your refrigerator is perfect for storing fresh produce because it has a constant temperature and high humidity.

Sweet Potatoes

When you store sweet potatoes, make sure that they are not sprouted or damaged. The main reason why people throw away their sweet potatoes is because of mold. You should cut off the rotten part and wrap the remainder in plastic wrap before storing them in your refrigerator’s vegetable drawer. Sweet potatoes can be stored for up to four weeks this way, but it is best to consume them within two weeks. It will keep them fresh if you choose a storage method where humidity does not drop too much, so do not place them on the produce shelf or in the crisper drawer!

If you have leftover cooked sweet potato mash it is best to reheat it by pouring some water over the mashed sweet potatoes in a skillet. After placing it on low heat, it should only take a few seconds to warm them up.

If you plan to keep the sweet potato longer than 3 weeks, you must first cut off any rotten spots or mold and wrap it with plastic wrap before storing it in a freezer bag or ziploc bag for more than 3 weeks in the refrigerator. If stored properly, ripe sweet potatoes can last up to six months.

When storing them for long periods of time, make sure that they do not get too chilled as this will affect their texture and can turn them into mushy bricks.

Green Beans

If you plan on freezing green beans then blanch them first to prevent freezer burn. Blanching involves plunging the beans in boiling water for about a minute then immediately placing them in ice cold water. This preserves their nutrients and keeps them from freezing into an awkward shape.

Green beans will last longer if you store them with other vegetables like cabbage, cauliflower, or broccoli because they give off less humidity (and ethylene gas) than tomatoes or apples! Be sure to keep green beans away from onions also as they cause their skins to turn yellow more quickly.

There are also a few more tips that you will want to remember:

  1. Don’t wash your vegetables until you plan on using them.
  2. Ensure that they aren’t overcompensating by getting too dry, if there is no moisture, then bacteria can grow.
  3. Don›t keep your produce in plastic bags for long periods.
  4. Cut off the ends of any root vegetables like carrots or onions before storing to prevent mold growth.
  5. If you notice mold growing on something, throw it out! Mold means that things have gone bad and are not safe to eat.

It’s always best to eat vegetables as soon as possible for maximum freshness but these tips will help make them last longer if necessary. Good luck and happy storing!

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